What Do Your Actions Say About You?

Everyday is a Vote

Every second of the day, you have the opportunity to vote. You get to vote for what you want your life to be, how you want to spend your time, and who you are with. Think about it. When you get home at the end of a long work day, you have a plethora of choices before you. All of them say something about what really matters to you and how much willpower you have.

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Simple Patterns or Goal Chasing, You Choose

Let’s look at the choice to watch reality TV. By making that choice, you are saying to yourself that reality TV is more important than any of your goals. More important than working on a six-pack, a Boston Qualifier, writing a book, catching up with an old friend, working towards financial independence, or being adventurous. Yes, it may seem dramatic, but how you choose to spend your time will determine your future. You can’t write a book by watching reality TV all night, every night. It requires you to sit down, write, and hammer out that book.

Remaining Conscious

This isn’t to say that every time you watch reality TV you’re an awful person and that you don’t care about any of your goals. It’s more to call attention to the importance of each decision and how it determines the trajectory of your life. We all could be more conscious during the day, thinking of how our decisions are shaping our lives.

It is difficult to be conscious of our decisions, but there are ways to hack our programming. Most humans have a tendency to fall into repeated patterns of action that are simple such as: watching TV, playing on a cellphone, or browsing the web. These activities are mindless and familiar.

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Hack Your Mind

To hack these patterns, write down what you want to accomplish each day in a notebook and keep to it. Plan out your day the night before, detailing what you want to do, hour by hour and stick to it. Writing something down is a promise to yourself, always keep those.

So what are your actions saying about you and your goals? Are you taking steps each day to achieve your goals or are you just fooling yourself and repeating patterns? Check out this YouTube video for some great motivation on the topic:)

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Quote – “Success is doing what you want to do, when you want, where you want, with whom you want, as much as you want.” – Tony Robbins

Always in Stride,

Jack

The Sexy Athlete: Sochi Olympics Observations

For the past few days I have enjoyed watching the Sochi Winter Olympics. Watching these athletes perform miraculous feats of strength, elegance, and acrobatics that I could only imagine is awe-inspiring. However, there is something else I have begun to take notice of outside of the athletics. The attractiveness. Nearly every girl flashed up on the screen is extremely attractive to me. There have been a few exceptions, but even those athletes we’re attractive to others, I’m sure. So this inspires my imagination to wonder why this is the case. Here are some theories for you:

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Could easily be an ad for any major clothing manufacturer.

1. Attractive Media Sells Better

Media outlets will always provide select shots and scenes for a variety of reasons. A shot can be cut because it is uninteresting, bad footage, wrong angle, or because it just won’t boost the numbers as well. There are many tricks used to entice you into watching TV and to keep watching it. I know for myself, if while flipping through channels, I see a sexy athlete in a bikini that I’m most likely going to stop and look at it. Male ape behavior at it’s finest. Theory one is that the attractive people are put on TV because it will lead to better ratings and more viewers, hence, more ad dollars. (Yes, I realize Duck Dynasty destroys this theory, but that works for other reasons).

Ekaterina Galkina, Russian Curler

Ekaterina Galkina, Russian Curler

2. When You Become Successful You Become Attractive

Success is extremely attractive on many levels. Heck, look at the sugar daddies who are far past their prime with Perfect 10 models. Monetary success is very attractive to many. So to can be athletic success. I’m attracted to people who are at the pinnacle of their sport. It fascinates me and I love that we chase similar pursuits day in and day out. I see myself in these people and in some ways would like to be them in my way. I like a girl who can handle herself, push herself to her limits, and has passion. All of this is found in the sexy athletes at the Olympics.

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3. Attractive People Get More Opportunities

Several studies are available on the topic of whether or not attractive people get more opportunities. David Hammersch has a book titled: Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful. The research suggests that attractive people get hired sooner, promoted quicker, sell more, and a bank loan more easily. It’s hard to deny some of the ways in which attractive people can sometimes get more opportunities. However, at the end of the day we are responsible for creating our own luck.

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4. In Subjective Judging, Attraction May Play a Role

The Winter Olympics features more subjective sports as compared to the Summer Olympics. This means that human judgement and opinion play a major role in who gets to go and who doesn’t. This begs the questions, if you have two athletes who have the same runs down the mountain in every way and you’re more attracted to one compared to the other, which one would you pick for the Olympics? I know we’d all like to say we’d be as honest and fair as possible, but that more than likely isn’t the case.

Team Russia Women

Team Russia Women

5. They Are Just That Damn Good

I think that no matter what, this definitely plays some type of role. These athletes are immensely talented and work tirelessly for years upon years to get to the upper level of the sport. This should not be overlooked.
s_s01_67578719Share your thoughts and enjoy the sexy athletes of Sochi:)

Always in Stride,

Jack

What the Body Craves

The human body is remarkably adaptable and proved over millions of years how it can evolve. Evolution is occurring on a daily basis, though not as drastic as going from ape to human. I still remember when I first started running competitively in 7th grade. I couldn’t stand it. I ran because it was a social activity and because I had been cut from the baseball team that year. I longed for runs that were out of the coach’s eye so my friends and I could goof off. Running was not a top priority to say the least.

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However, over the years an evolution took place. Running became a passion and a necessity. Little by little the addiction grew until running became one of the most important things in my life. I am now at the point where I crave running. I have tuned my body with nutrition and training to be ready to go at a moment’s notice. In return, it expects to be tested on a daily basis.

I feel it in the core of my being if I don’t get a workout in during the day. My body longs to be in motion, doing what it is made to do and what I have tuned it to do (check out the YouTube video for a great commercial talking about this). This is rooted in evolution, given that if you didn’t move during the day to get your food, you most likely died. Even on days when I don’t feel my best, I still desire to be in motion.
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Today, I wasn’t feeling so great after a long weekend of partaking in some delicious adult beverages with a best friend from high school. The day was winding down and I still had yet to get in a workout. I attempted to take a nap but my body wasn’t having it. Even in a less than ideal state, my body craved an intense workout. I summoned some motivation and laced up my shoes. That 8 mile run was one of my best in recent weeks followed by a killer 15 minutes of abs. My body ate it up and loved it. I was left feeling far better than if I had stayed in for a nap and resorting to laziness.

What have you taught your body to crave?

Always in Stride,

Jack

8 Big Life Goals for the Next 5 Years

Well it’s about that time again for me to lay out some big life goals for myself over the next 5 years. Last time I did this, I was able to stick to it and achieve exactly what I was hoping to. However, I do not believe it is within the nature of man to remain stagnant and satisfied, that is reserved for death. My mind has been racing a lot as of late and it’s time to identify and call out a new direction.

1. Financially Sound and Out of Debt

At this point in time I have $32000 worth of debt left from college (easy ladies, don’t all jump at once). This debt is a pain in the ass to be completely honest. It comes with an interest rate that is larceny and contributes to my conspiracy of how our whole generation was fucked over, but that’s for another day. I want nothing more financially than to be out from under the thumb of this and back to zero. I’d like to not send Ed Financial Services $250 a month, $150 of which goes to a ludicrous interest rate. I’d like the financial freedom to invest, grow, and make purchases. I want financial freedom not only from student loans but also from working as well. I want to make enough on my own to cover my costs of life and to “work” on the side for “fun”. I’m far more productive that way.

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2. Own a Home in California

If you do the math of goal 1 and goal 2, it adds up to quite a lot. There is not place in the world that I have felt more at home in than California. I love the views, the beauty, the people, the cities, the climate, the diversity, the attitudes, and pretty much everything about it. California is my muse and I would always like to have a bungalow here to come home to for at least some duration during the year. I fought so hard to get out here and stay here, I want to make sure I can always come back here.

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3. Remain Unmarried

I am sure that this will be the goal that has the most people up in arms and will create a nice little Facebook comment firestorm. Ever since some rather interesting relationships in college, I have realized that I absolutely love being single and what it allows me to do. I don’t answer to anyone, about anything, at any time. At the drop of a hat I can do whatever I like with whoever I like. I love meeting a wide variety of people without having someone looking over my shoulder. I like getting to know who is compatible with me. I also like having plenty of me-time considering 65 years of being with the same person is a long time, it can wait a while longer. Of all the couples I know in-between the ages of 20-30 who are married, I think maybe 2% of them have a marriage that is even close to resembling something that I would want. Honestly (and don’t ask if you are that couple). Most of the time what I hear from married persons is complaints about lost dreams, petty fights, and god knows what else (I zone out sometimes). It’s just not for me at this point in time. I’m an independent asshole who likes doing what he likes doing. I’m not in a mindset that works for a marriage and I know it. I think it’s smart and responsible to not enter into a legally binding contract when I am not ready. Especially when there is a 50% chance of success. Hell, I think every marriage ceremony should have a ceremonial coin flip: heads means you get married, tails means it’s off. Yes, I’m a cynic but I also know what makes me happy. It’s not to say I’ll never be married or never consider it, but I know what works for me right now. I won’t marry unless I find someone with whom my goals, passions, and desires align with almost perfectly. I do agree there has to be some sacrifice for small things, but no way am I sacrificing my dreams and what makes me happy. If I get married, the girl will probably be similar to the one in this CitiCards commercial. Besides, I couldn’t even afford marriage at this point:)

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4. Live Abroad

I have gotten really good at following my gut since college. I get an idea in my head and I stay true to it no matter what. California was that way, quitting Accenture was that way, and most of my dreams and passions are that way. For the past few years I have had a desire to live in Australia, Spain, South Africa, and Vancouver. I’ve never been to any of these places and I can’t quite explain why, but my gut is telling me it’s right and the path I need to be on.

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5. Published

I have been working on a few different books over the past few years with varying degrees of success. Resistance gets in the way and I worry of what the critics will think, which is silly. In the next 5 years I want to have at least 1 book published, regardless of how bad it is. I need to get the monkey off my back and let the muse take over from there.

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6. Western States 100

The Western States 100 is one of the most prestigious endurance events in the world. It started off as a horse race and evolved into a foot race when a horse pulled up lame one year and the owner completed the course the following year on foot in just under 24 hours. The course travels from Squaw Valley, CA to Auburn, CA and features around 19,000 feet of elevation gain and 21,000 feet of elevation loss. It is another one of those things calling me.

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wser.org

7. Blog Success and Payment of Rent/Mortgage

This blog started out as a passion project to express myself and get out frustrations while working at a job I really didn’t belong at. It has evolved into my voice and a way for me to establish myself in the industry I love. It was recently monetized and is becoming profitable. However, I have bigger goals for it to reach a wider audience. I want to connect people to each other and to ideas that advance the running community. I also would like the blog to cover my rent and or mortgage on a monthly basis:)

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8. Get in Better Shape Every Year

Since 18, each year I have been in the best shape of my life. I want this to continue and at the very least be in the Touch of Gray commercials at age 55. I see no reason to get out of shape and to let eating habits slide. I’m going to keep running and working out each and every day, staying fit and able for whatever comes my way.

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Feel free to argue or criticize. It’s fun that way:)

Always in Stride,

Jack

Every Runner, A Motivation Source

The Nature of Motivation

Motivation has the tendency to come in unique forms and vehicles. We are never quite sure when it will show up and why we find it motivating. The important part is that it does motivate us and push us to become a better version of ourselves. Every day when I wake up, I start with a motivational YouTube video to get me inspired to take on the day.

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The Journey of the Everyday Man

One thing I find disheartening about motivation though, is how many people do not see themselves as motivating. They assume that to be motivating, you have to be an athlete, a strong leader, or someone “important”. This is not the case. I am in love and obsessed with the Ironman recap videos that NBC Sports puts out every year. They put on an hour to hour and a half recap of the Ironman World Championship documenting the journey of the pros as well as the average person. I watch the video, not to see how the pros did, but to hear the stories of the every day man such as Brain Boyle (below).

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Being Relatable is Motivational

Hearing the struggles that the common man endures is relatable. We can see ourselves in that struggle far better than we can see it in the elite athletes of the world. They know our pain, struggle, and despair. They are training day in and day out with kids, spouses, mortgages, day jobs, and diseases. They are paying their own way to the race and doing it for their own self-satisfaction. They may think that no one is watching them, but they are wrong.

Passion is Fuel for Others

I love being in the cheering section in the final miles of a race. There is so much drama and human emotion during the tail end of the race. I vividly remember athletes slowing to a walk as the weight of the distance comes down upon them. What I find most motivating is watching them feed off the energy of the crowd and finding a way to turn their walk, back into a run. You can see the determination in their face and eyes. Their passion burns brightly and the surrounding people feed off that energy. The crowd surges with the quickening pace of the runner and all inhibition of human emotion is lost. It is pure and it is real. These are the moments I remember most.

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You Motivate Someone Every Day You Run

Keep this in mind, every day you go for a run. Often people are too shy to dole out compliments, but I can guarantee you someone you don’t know is inspired by your run. You are a motivator, a hero, and a leader just because you get out there each day and go for a run. Never underestimate yourself and always push on. You are a motivation source to many. (This means you too Mom:)

Always in Stride,

Jack

Superbowl Runday!

That special time of year has come around once again, the time of year when most Americans embark on a day’s journey of countless chicken wings, more beers than they can count, and sitting on the couch. Superbowl Sunday. I enjoy Superbowl Sunday myself and will be cheering for the high flyin’ Seahawks today. However, just because it is a day of sloth for most, does not mean that you get to skimp on your run! Turn Superbowl Sunday into Superbowl Runday!

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Running on days when others are likely to take a pass feels just that much better. It’s nice to have the trails to yourself for a while knowing that you’re earning your beer, chips, and dip. If your team is in the Superbowl, run in your team’s gear and show it off. When you’re sitting down, watching the big game and seeing ridiculous commercial after ridiculous commercial, you will be satisfied knowing that you got that run in. Comment with who you are cheering for!

Always in Stride,

Jack

Top 10 Books on Running Science & Training

I spend a lot of my days researching running science, training principles, and nutrition. It is my passion and simply fascinates me. I can’t get enough of the information and am always looking for the next great book to make sense of the sport and activity I love. So far, I have developed quite the expansive library on the topic, sitting at around 100 books or so with still many more to buy and read. For now, I wanted to share with you the top 10 books on running science, training principles, and nutrition. Enjoy:

1. Anatomy for Runners – Jay Dicharry

I first found out about this book when going through my Level 1 Natural Running Coach certification. It was a required reading for the course, so I picked it up. With a name like “Anatomy for Runners“, I was expecting a dry, long read on human anatomy. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Dicharry, MPT, SCS, does an amazing job at crafting a book that is easily read by all levels. The dry sense of humor carried throughout the book keeps you laughing and enthralled in the read. He focuses on a wide variety of topics including: biomechanics, micro anatomy, soft tissue mobility, footwear, running science, and the running gait. He has a knack for developing imagery and analogies to help the common man understand is typically complex anatomy and science. I quote this book more than any other book in my collection and continue to return to it for reference and re-reads. It is an absolute must that you buy this book and use it often.

Anatomy for Runners

  2. Tread Lightly: Form, Footwear, and the Quest for Injury-Free Running  – Peter Larson and Bill Katovsky

Tread Lightly was another book that was required reading for the Level 1 Natural Running Coach course. Larson, Ph.D Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Katovsky, Tri-Athlete Magazine Founder, do a great job at covering the wide gamut of running in a way that we all can understand. They cite a variety of studies and tests to back up their information as well as provide places to go for more information. The book tackles the evolution of running, running injuries, running form, running shoes, foot strike, nutrition, biomechanics, running science, and much more. They have some amazing things to say not only in the book but with Pete’s blog as well: www.runblogger.com.

Tread Lightly

3. Natural Running – Danny Abshire

Natural Running was one of the first books I ever read that inspired me to reconsider running form and what it all meant. For the longest time, I had always believed that we “ran the way we ran” and that was it. I assumed that running was not like other sports and did not need certain skills and techniques. Natural Running helped me to think otherwise and refine my movement patterns for more efficient, healthier running. Danny is a master at walking you through the running gait and biomechanics of the foot. He has a fantastic grasp on the material and translates it well to everyone both in the book and in person. The book finishes with an eight week transition plan to natural running to help ensure an effective, injury-free transition. The book also hits on some of the history of Danny and his co-founding of Newton Running. If you ever get the chance to join Danny for one of his Saturday morning Natural Run Clinics in Boulder, Colorado, make sure you do, it’s a treat. He is by far the most passionate and happy runner I have ever had the pleasure of meeting in my life.

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4. Daniel’s Running Formula – Jack Daniels, PhD

For a long time I believed that the best way to train was to simply go out and run hard. I thought little of rest and recovery days and subscribed to the “no pain, no gain” mentality. I was very wrong. Throughout high school and college, some were able to get through to me with training principles, but nothing worked as well as Daniel’s Running Formula. I read this book when I was working on starting up my coaching company and it changed my view on training drastically. Daniels goes deep into the running science of training and explains why certain things work and others don’t. He is a student of Lydiard as it shows in the training plans he gives in the book. They focus on periodization of training and peaking at just the right time for the big race. Reading this book has changed my training completely and has led me to far more effective training with less injuries. A bit of a tougher read, but definitely pick it up!

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5. Becoming a Supple Leopard – Dr. Kelly Starrett

Wouldn’t it be awesome if we were as athletic and poised as a leopard? If we were ready to strike at any moment, enlisting all of our muscles and fibers to work together to perform an action? That’s the goal of Becoming a Supple Leopard by Dr. Kelly Starrett. Starrett focuses on educating you about the movement and mobility systems of the body as well as how to stabilize your body. Most of us have failed to learn the correct movements and stabilization techniques and as a result, we are led to injuries. Starrett teaches us how to get in the correct positions and how to break up fascia to increase our range of motion for all activities. If you want to learn how to keep yourself in the best posture as well as how the body works and moves, pick this book up!

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6. Chi Running – Danny Dreyer

Not so long ago, I was a very stressed out runner who also happened to have pretty bad form. I put a lot of pressure on myself for both races and training runs. It was unnecessary and only served to hamper my runs. Chi Running helped get me to relax during my running as well as to find a more efficient running form. Dreyer takes a lot of time to focus on running in harmony with our natural movements as well as the mental aspects of running. I got a lot of great analogies from Dreyer on how to run correctly that I use when coaching others. This book is a great read for both your mental and physical health during running.

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7. The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing – Dr. Philip Maffetone

If you’re looking for a truly holistic book on training, Dr. Phil Maffetone has made it with The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing. Dr. Maffetone spares no detail as he goes through building the endurance foundation, diet and nutrition, and the importance of self-care and injury prevention. The book features 34 detailed chapters over 516 pages with a great index to help you find exactly what you’re looking for. One of the top pieces of running science in the book is the MAF test, which focuses on going slower to get faster. Maffetone has helped a myriad of triathletes and runners recover from over training and brings all aspects of their training together. A must have for every runner’s bookshelf.

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8. Anatomy of Movement – Blandine Calais-Germain

If you’re looking to get into the nitty-gritty of how your body works, then Anatomy of Movement by Blandine Calais-Germain is the book for you. This resource details how all the muscles, tendons, bones, and ligaments work together to move us. My favorite chapters are the ones towards the end that focus on the lower body, specifically the foot. It can help you to understand the real source of an injury by looking at how you are connected inside, it’s not quite what you think. Pick this one up as a great reference, especially to help diagnose what may be going on with an injury.

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9. Running the Lydiard Way – Arthur Lydiard

When one hears the Lydiard name, it is met with great reverence. Lydiard revolutionized the running world by developing his periodization of training. Lydiard was able to connect the dots as to what was working and why. The tales of those he coached are legendary and he will forever be remembered as one of the greatest running coaches the world has ever seen. Most all of his training principles still hold up today and guide the top runners to the pinnacle of our sport. A fantastic read that is easy and offers lots of great advice to merge into your own training.

Lydiard Way

10. Born to Run – Chris McDougall

Say what you will about the message of Born to Run or how the message was taken, McDougall is a fantastic story-teller and the book is a fun read. No matter where you stand on the barefoot argument, McDougall is a master at crafting a story that goes down one path, diverts to another story, and then comes full circle. I found Born to Run to be a gripping read that inspired me to further research running on all fronts. I can still remember sitting on my porch reading this gem then heading to Amazon.com to buy a slew of books on running and running science. If you’re looking for a great story or a look into the barefoot debate, pick up Born to Run and enjoy the ride.

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I hope that you find a few of these books on running science, training, and anatomy as entertaining, enlightening, and as useful as I have. I love each and every one of these books and often pull them off the shelf for reference and to re-read them. However, this isn’t an exhaustive list, please comment with your favorites  so I can add them to my reading list!

Always in Stride,

Jack

Cold Weather Running, Put One Sock On

Running in the cold is a brutal task most of the time. Sure there can be those magical runs with the snow lightly falling, trees covered in snow, temperature just right, and you’re floating along in a winter wonderland, however, that’s not usually the case. Instead you’re attempting to avoid slush puddles, shivering uncontrollably, possibly catching frostbite, losing feeling in all of your limbs, have frozen snot on your face, and can’t get any traction. Given that the latter is the more realistic cold weather running day, getting out the door can be rather tough.

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The best trick I’ve found to get out the door for any weather or lack of motivation is to simply put one running sock on. Once you have put on one running sock, you have made your intentions clear through your actions. You’ve made a statement to yourself that the run is going to happen and it’s just a snowball effect from there. After one sock goes on, the next comes easy, then the tights, until you’re ready to head out the door and brave the cold. The momentum carries you through, after all, it would be silly to take that sock back off and retreat from your run.

One sock is all it takes!

One sock is all it takes!

Another thing I have noticed, is that I’ve never regretted a single run. I’m always glad that I got out there, even if I did freeze my butt off. I dealt with awful temperatures for 22 years but take some satisfaction in knowing I can best the elements with my favorite Patagonia Jacket and Gore-tex gloves. All it takes is the willpower, gear, and putting that first sock on. So what do you say? How about a snowy, icy, cold weather run?

I may have an addiction to Patagonia:)

I may have an addiction to Patagonia:)

Look for the next winter post in a few days on the best gear to beat the cold!

Always in Stride,

Jack

 

Paralyzed by the Critics

In ramping up my website and personal brand, I have grown unnecessarily concerned with what the critics may think. It is unusual for me, as I typically don’t care but I guess for some reason it’s different for me when taking myself far more public than I ever have before. With YouTube videos, increased blog presence, a Podcast on the way, and much more; I am going to be spreading my name and ideas all across the interwebs. I do believe I have a lot to say and share that others can benefit from.

That being said, from time to time I have partially paralyzed myself with fear of the critics and fear of not being perfect. I’m worried that a running science blog post will be torn apart because I don’t have a Master’s and only have a Bachelor’s. I’m worried that a blog will be torn apart because I didn’t edit it enough. I’m afraid of the backlash from expressing ideas that go against the grain or from exposing poor industry standards. From the step back view, it’s quite silly and I laugh at myself. I’ve always been a risk taker and it is something I love about my personality. At this point it’s just a matter of taking the leap and putting it all out there.

No one when they first start something is perfectly polished. It would be impossible to expect that. There are growing pains and learning curves that must be experienced on the way to something great. In creating a personal brand and a place for myself in the running biomechanics sphere, it will no doubt be the same types of trials and tribulations. There will be many who disagree and tear me apart as well as many who love what I have to say and agree with me. At the end of the day the conversation will be pushed along and biomechanics debates will be better for it. A degree can help, but so to can the direct experience I get on a daily basis. I read as much as any student from a variety of textbooks and books by top PTs, doctors, researchers, shoe manufacturers, and anything else I can get my hands on.

When comparing it to running, it would be similar to not going to the start line for fear of not finishing. You must leave it all out on the course and see what you are made of. Give your gifts to the best of your ability and die/finish with nothing left inside. It is the only true way to live a life.

Get ready for The Motivated Runner to take off:)

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” – Teddy Roosevelt

Always in Stride,

Jack

There Is No “Normal”

Since around the time of Thanksgiving I have been stuck in a bit of a rut. My running, writing, and overall motivation have been off and not at the levels they should be. I simply told myself that once things returned to “normal” I would be right back at it, driven as ever. Fast forward to early January and the motivation for all these fine activities was still missing.

See the thing is, there is no “normal”. There will always be disruptions and there is no ideal time to do the things you need to. Distraction and resistance will always be there to meet you in whatever form she decides to take. It could be going out with friends, holiday dinners, cold weather, or any other myriad of options.The perfect time to do something is the least optimal time. When something is done at the least optimal time, you learn something about yourself. You learn that you are capable of doing anything that you set your mind to. 2AM on a Friday evening when everyone else is out can be the perfect time for a run or for a blog post. Who’s to say it isn’t?

If you often find yourself struggling with this resistance and inner battle, I highly recommend you pick up the book The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield. He does an amazing job at attacking procrastination, resistance, and how we put off becoming our true self we were meant to be. It has helped me a lot to overcome my own issues and realize I need to just get started with what I should be doing. The momentum builds from there until it barrels along and I find myself extremely happy that I did what was required of me.

WarofArt

This especially applies to going for a run. It can be so easy to come up with so many reasons why you shouldn’t go for a run. However, all that matters is that feeling you get from going on a run. In 14 years of running, I have yet to regret a single run. Upon returning, I am always glad I embraced the struggle and made it out the door.

regret

Always in Stride,

Jack